• K-5 Report Card Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1. Why are you changing the report card?

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    We are in the midst of a multi-year process of adjusting how we are measuring and reporting student progress. This is due to a multitude of factors, including changing standards/frameworks at New York State Education Department (NYSED) level in social studies, mathematics, English Language Arts, science, physical education and health, and the visual and performing arts. In addition, our Strategic Coherence Plan provides a compass for the types of skills and attributes that we would like to foster. It is our intention that the revisions to the report card reflect this evolution.

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  • 2. Who is recommending these changes?

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    The K-5 Report Card Committee commenced in the summer of 2018 to begin our revision process.  This group is comprised of classroom teachers, specialists, and building and district-level administrators.

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  • 3. What were the internal goals of the changes to the 2018-19 report card?

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    We aimed for more alignment and consistency K-5.  We also strived for increased accuracy in assessing and reporting what your child is learning in his/her classroom(s). This is in addition to the external and internal factors articulated in answer #1.

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  • 4. What is different about the report card from 2018-19 to this year?

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    The first major change has to do with how students are rated. Although the descriptors of ‘Not Yet Meeting Expectations’, ‘Progressing Towards Expectations’, ‘Meets Expectations’ and ‘Consistently Exceeds Expectations’ remain the same, we have eliminated the previously accompanying ‘1-4’ or 0-100 (4th & 5th grade math) numeric system.

    Additional changes include some indicators for each content area.

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  • 5. Why did you get rid of the numbers?

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    We eliminated the numeric rating system for several reasons 1) we believe that a ‘descriptors only’ approach allows for more of a focus on the learning than the score, 2) we also believe that a ‘descriptors only’ rating system conveys a more nuanced description of your child’s performance and, 3) it detangles the association with the NYS Assessments, allowing for further focus on the standard/practice vs. the score. In 4th and 5th grade Mathematics, we eliminated the 0-100 numeric average score, again believing that that you will glean more information about your child’s mathematical progress through the descriptors attached to each standard/practice.

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  • 6. How should I use this report card to speak my child about their progress?

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    A report card assesses the progress of a student at a given point in time.  It is our belief that learning is an ongoing process that is optimized when students can reflect on their growth and set goals towards their future.  Asking students to self-assess on a given skill, then compare that assessment with that of their teacher, is a great starting point. Here is another resource that provides tips for speaking to your child about their learning:

                          ♦  Discussing Your Child’s Report Card

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  • 7. How will this impact my child as they transition to Wells Middle School?

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    We have had discussions with middle school staff regarding this change.  As you may or may not know, advanced math selection begins for students entering sixth grade, and numeric averages were a part of the formula for determining placement in the past.  However, there are multiple data points used, including teacher recommendation, the score on a local common assessment, and STAR math, to name a few. Also, asking teachers to assess on the report card using specific indicators actually provides more information about specific skills/content knowledge.  With all of that said, we believe that there is more than enough objective data to assist us in making an advanced math decision for students entering sixth grade.

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  • 8. Who can I speak to if I have questions about the report card?

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    Your child’s teacher is always the first point of contact, as they can provide the most specific information about your child.  If the teacher is unable to answer your question, your child’s building principal can speak to the specifics of the report card.

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