Part 154 Comprehensive Plan

  • The ENL program at Brewster Central School District is designed to fit the diverse needs of our ELL students at each step of their academic journey. At each grade level, ENL Instruction is specifically designed to align with the Common Core Learning Standards as well as ensuring the development of academic language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the content areas.  Entering and emerging ELLs receive intensive small group language instruction across all grade levels. At the secondary level, the ELL’s native language is valued in our program to maintain content knowledge while acquiring English language proficiency. Along with their mandated English language and literacy instruction, ELLs participate in mainstream classroom experiences when they enter the district. Where larger clusters of ELLs exist, collaboration is essential. This is a 21st century skill that all teachers need to engage in for the sake of the diverse student population. All English language learners receive a form of integrated ENL services, which are satisfied through co-teaching.

    Our faculty understands that acquiring English proficiency, according to New York State measures is only one indicator of academic achievement. Brewster Central School District knows the value of closely tracking the continued progress of former ENL students.  This is accomplished by co-teaching, direct instruction and consultation with mainstream teachers. In accordance with Part 154 regulations, Commanding students are serviced 90 minutes per week for two years.

    Guiding Principles

    Our Department has a shared philosophy that is based on many years of research and professional as well as personal experience. Our beliefs have been established as a result of working collaboratively both in school and in the community as well as on research based instructional practices.  The ENL Department aims to develop and maintain a continuum of service rooted firmly in the principles of the “Blueprint for English Language Learners (ELLs) Success."

    • All teachers are teachers of English Language Learners, and need to plan accordingly.
    • All school boards and district/school leaders are responsible for ensuring that the academic, linguistic, social, and emotional needs of ELLs.
    • Districts and schools engage all English Language Learners in instruction that is grade-appropriate, academically rigorous, and aligned with the New York State Common Core Learning Standards.
    • Districts and Schools recognize that bilingualism and biliteracy are assets.
    • Districts and schools value all parents and families of ELLs as partners in education and effectively involve them in the education of their children.
    • District and school communities leverage the expertise of Bilingual, ESL and Languages Other Than English (LOTE) teachers and support personnel while increasing their professional capacities.
    • Districts and school communities leverage ELLs’ home languages, cultural assets and prior knowledge.
    • District and schools use diagnostics tools and formative assessments practices in order to measure ELLs’ content knowledge as well as new and home language development to inform instruction.

    The Brewster Central School District believes in building strong community partnerships with those organizations that support ELLs and their families. We continue  to build bridges between school, home, and community based organizations. Within the last two years, the district administration created an ENL Advisory Group to include community organizations, district staff, Board of Education members and district administrators.  This group was created in order to partner with community organizations.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for Newcomer ELLs are designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our Newcomer ELLs, we have implemented three instructional programs, Intergrated-Co-Teach,  Stand-Alone ENL, and a Newcomer Morning Program.

    The BCSD offers a newcomer program of intensive literacy and language instruction 60-85 minutes a day, before school, 4-5 days at the elementary level (K-5). Newcomers are also pulled out in a Stand Alone ENL Model for 60 minutes per day, 5 days a week for explicit, targeted instruction. Newcomer ELLs at the Intermediate level (grades 3-5) work with a bilingual Social Worker in a Newcomer group to help them transition into their new school and culture.

    At the secondary level, Newcomer ELLs meet five times per week for 90 minutes each time learning English both through the content areas and in a stand alone ENL model.  Newcomer ELLs are supported by bilingual ENL Teachers and bilingual Teaching Assistants who use the Newcomer ELLs’ L1 to transition them as they learn English. These teachers and teaching assistants support ELLs both in the content-area classes as well as in Stand Alone ENL classes.  At the middle school, specifically, an Integrated Co-Teaching/Early Exit Bilingual class is offered in Social Studies and Science.

    The focus of all instruction is to meet the expectations of the New York State Common Core Learning Standards and Bilingual Progressions. Student grouping decisions are based upon students’ English proficiency levels. A flexible approach, based upon student’s needs, is used by teachers so that they incorporate a variety of instructional approaches.

    In addition, BCSD offers preparation for the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) courses in Spanish during the school day. Students enrolled in these courses are encouraged to stay after their TASC courses and audit high school courses, penalty free, so that they increase their English language proficiency, learn more content, and integrate into the rest of the high school day.

    The BCSD also has partnered with Dutchess Community College (DCC) to provide a non-credit ENL course at the high school for SLIFE students. In collaboration with Dutchess Community College, we have aso created a program to teach English to older ELLs and families in the community offered by DCC.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for Developing ELLs are also designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our Developing ELLs, we have implemented two instructional programs, Intergrated-Co-Teach and Stand-Alone ENL.

    At the start of the 2015-2016 school year grades K-5 adopted the Teachers College Reading and Writing Workshop, the Fountas Pinnell benchmark assessment in Reading and the Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention for struggling readers and ELLs.

    Additionally, the ENL program has taken measures to close the achievement gap by providing ENL services in Mathematics, an area where students have struggled and lagged behind their grade level peers. Content-specialized ENL teachers strive to support their students in an inclusive environment, by adapting and differentiating lessons, implementing SIOP strategies, and using best practices in TESOL.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for SIFE are designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our SIFE, we have implemented three instructional programs, Integrated-Co-Teach, Stand-Alone ENL/Sheltered Instruction and Transitional Bilingual programs with an emphasis on building background knowledge and foundational skills needed to be successful in the content areas.

    Programs and Instructional practices in place specifically for Students with Interrupted/Inconsistent Formal Education (SIFE) in the Brewster Central School District are designed to build the foundational skills needed in the four core content areas: English, Math, Social studies, and Science.  

    At the elementary/intermediate level, SIFE students are fully integrated in the general education classroom.  An ENL teacher supports SIFE students in both English Language Arts and Math during most if not all of these content area periods.  The instructional practices are designed to build a solid foundation in the content areas by building background knowledge, developing academic vocabulary, language, and content.

    At the secondary level, SIFE are placed on a foundations track upon arrival for at least one year depending on each student’s individual needs.  This foundations track provides classes that develop the foundational skills needed in English, Math, Science, and Social Studies.

    In the BCSD when a referral is made to the Committee on Special Education of an English Language Learner, a bilingual evaluation is considered and if deemed necessary, it is provided for the ELL.  Once identified as having a disability, ELLs are placed in the least restrictive environment with ENL services as an integral part of his/her program.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for ELLs with a Disability (having an IEP) have focused on keeping our ELLs fully included in the mainstream classroom.  ENL teachers co-teach with classroom and Special Education teachers so that ELLs with a Disability (having an IEP) can remain in their classrooms in an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition while, at the same time, building their capacities in the content areas.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for Long Term ELLs are designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our Long Term ELLs, we have implemented two instructional programs, Integrated-Co-Teach and Stand-Alone ENL.

    Programs and Instructional practices in place specifically Long Term ELLs for Students in the Brewster Central School District are designed to build the foundational skills needed in the four core content areas: English, Math, Social Studies, and Science.  

    At the middle school level we have created a class for Long Term ELLs that specifically works on targeted skills needed in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This class is taught by a dually certified TESOL/Social Studies highly qualified teacher.   

    Our goal for our Long Term ELLs is to focus our efforts on specific and explicit targeted instruction in the four language modalities to continue to promote English Language Proficiency.

    In the BSCD, there are a total of four schools. In 2015-2016 each school was in charge of enrolling/registering, screening, identifying, and placing ELLs in appropriate programs. At each level, when a new entrant was welcomed, one of the school ENL Teachers or ENL Teaching Assistants would register the new entrant.  Each school in the district has at least one qualified bilingual person to enroll/register, screen, identify, and place ELLs in appropriate programs. This included sitting with the parent or person with parental relation to go through any paperwork, in their home language if needed. After registration took place, ENL teachers or ENL teachers with the help of a bilingual Teaching Assistant gave the Home Language Questionnaire. Then the ENL Teacher or TA met with the student to conduct an individual interview which included, but was not limited to, academic, familial, and home country background information.  Once this information was gathered and it was determined that the student was eligible to take the language proficiency exam, the ENL teacher administered the NYSITELL as well as a local math and reading comprehension screener at the secondary level and early literacy skills at the elementary level, in the student’s home language, to determine where the student’s academic skills are in his/her native language. This screening helped to better place ELLs in the appropriate settings. After an English Proficiency level was determined for each student, a letter was sent to parents/person with parental relation in their home language informing them of the level of English proficiency of the student assessed and a program designation. ENL Teachers also reached out to parents/person with parental relation by phone to let them know the student’s level and the services that would be provided.

    As mentioned above, the ENL Teachers and Teaching Assistants were responsible for this process at the different schools.  At the elementary level, the name of persons responsible, including their qualifications and training, for conducting the initial screening, which includes the completion of the HLQ and the individual interviews  were the ENL Teachers: At the elementary level: Gabriele Lappe (TESOL, permanent, and Literacy B-6 professional) , Christine Collesian (TESOL and Reading certified - both permanent), Lorraine Lennon (TESOL, permanent) and the Teaching Assistant: Myra Vario (TA Level 1 certification).

    At the intermediate level, Karen Dakin, Noelle Geniso (TESOL certified, Initial)  (ENL Teachers), Carrie Jimenez (TA Level 1 certification) and Elizabeth Stellano-Amable (TA Level 3 certification) (Teaching Assistants) were responsible for this process.  At the middle school, the persons responsible were Yanire Wickers (TESOL permanent) (ENL Teacher) and Angel Peña (TA Level 2 certification). At the high school level, Neisy Russo (TESOL and Literacy B-6, both professional) and Angel Peña (TA Level 2 certification) were the persons in charge of this process. Eight of the eleven highly qualified professionals mentioned above are bilingual (English/Spanish).

    2015-2016, at each school level, elementary through high school, when a new SIFE entrant was welcomed, one of the school ENL Teachers or ENL Teaching Assistants registered the new SIFE entrant.  Each school in the district has at least one qualified bilingual person to enroll/register, screen, identify, and place SIFE in appropriate programs. This included sitting with the parent or person with parental relation to go through any paperwork, in their home language if needed. During registration, a Home Language Questionnaire was provided to the parent/person with parental relation to fill out. After registration was complete, ENL teachers, or ENL teachers with the help of a bilingual Teaching Assistant, met with the student to interview the student with an interview questionnaire which included, but was not limited to, academic, familial, and home country background information.  Once this information was gathered, an ENL teacher would administer the NYSITELL as well as local math and reading comprehension screeners at the secondary level and early literacy and math skills screeners at the elementary level, in the student’s home language, to determine the student’s academic skill level in his/her native language. This screening helped to better place SIFE in the appropriate settings. After an English Proficiency level was determined for each student, a letter was sent to parents/person with parental relation in their home language informing them of the level of English proficiency of the student assessed and a program designation. ENL Teachers also reached out to parents/person with parental relation by phone to let them know the student’s level and the services that would be provided. When it was determined that the student was a SIFE, more information was asked of both parent/person in parental relation and student.  The information gathered was both academic and home country in nature to better understand the student and his/her situation.

    In 2015-2016 each school was in charge of enrolling/registering, screening, identifying, and placing ELLs with a Disability (with an IEP) in appropriate programs. At each level, when an  ELLs with a Disability (with an IEP) was welcomed, one of the school ENL Teachers or ENL Teaching Assistants would register the ELL with a Disability (with an IEP) and give the Home Language Questionnaire. At this time, the ENL teacher would reach out to the former school and/or the caseworker to make sure that the District had all of the needed paperwork (IEP) in order to place the ELL with a Disability (with an IEP) in the appropriate setting based on his/her IEP. At this time, the ENL Teacher, the principal of the school, and the Director of Special Ed or the Committee Chair of the CSE, the Language Proficiency Team, would discuss the placement of the ELL with a Disability (with an IEP) to ensure that (s)he was placed in the appropriate setting based on his/her IEP and to ensure that both ENL and Special Education services were met.  The same protocol took place for registering and screening purposes, including sitting with the parent or person with parental relation to go through any paperwork, in their home language if needed. During registration, the Home Language Questionnaire was administered. After registration was complete, ENL teachers or ENL teachers with the help of a bilingual Teaching Assistant met with the student to interview the student with an interview questionnaire which included, but was not limited to, academic, familial, and home country background information. Once this information was gathered, the ENL teachers would administer the NYSITELL (if the student was coming from another state or country) as well as a local math and reading comprehension screener at the secondary level and early literacy skills at the elementary level, in the student’s home language, to determine where the student’s academic skills were in his/her native language if needed. If the student was coming from a NY State school or from another state, school records were analyzed and became part of the registration process.

    In 2015-2016 the district provided parents and other persons in parental relation with information about all English as a New Language programs and Transitional Bilingual Programs available in the district, as well as information and notices regarding program placement and the rights of such parents or persons in parental relation in person, by letter, and by phone. When the parent or person with parental relation came for the intake interview, the ENL Teacher explained the English as a New Language Program or Transitional Bilingual Program and the services to support this particular ELL.  

    The district provides parents and other persons in parental relation with information in the language or mode of communication that they best understand in many ways.  The first way is the district sends out written materials for parents in their home language so that they can be informed and take part, as an integral part, of the school community.  If for some reason, the district is unable to send out material in the home language, an ENL teacher will reach out to the parent through Language Line, a service that the district has obtained in order to ensure that all parents are communicated with in the language in which they best understand.  Another way the district provides parents and other persons with information in the language or mode of communication that they best understand is by providing bilingual high school students with community service hours to come to the elementary and intermediate levels to help translate for grade level Open Houses and/or parent sessions where parents are learning technology or district specific programs.  The BCSD also partners with BOCES (Boards of Cooperative Educational Services) to obtain highly qualified interpreters for face to face meetings with parents and to translate written communication to parents.

    ENL Teachers in the BSCD meet with individual parents on an as needed basis.  These meetings are done when we see the need to work closely with a parent to support the student.  In addition to individual meetings, we offer regular workshops for all parents throughout the year. In 2015-16, the K-2 building focused on kindergarten to educate parents about the growing demands of the Common Core Curriculum and the need for more parental involvement.

    The district’s system to annually measure and track the academic progress and English language proficiency of English Language Learners and the use of data to drive instruction is one that BCSD takes very seriously.  Each English Language Learner is benchmarked three times a year in math and reading as well as daily in their classrooms. In 2015-2016, the K-5 grade levels adopted the Fountas & Pinnell screener, a benchmark screening tool through Columbia University’s Teacher’s College (TC) Reading & Writing Workshop Model, to benchmark all students, including ELLs in reading comprehension. This screener was administered one on one with each student and assessed fluency and comprehension. In benchmarking with this screener, on a one-on-one basis, we were able to assess an ELL’s reading, speaking, and listening while at the same time screening his/her academic progress throughout the year. English Language Learners that scored below grade level were provided with Reading services during the school day using the Leveled Literacy Intervention Reading Program. The data gathered from the benchmark assessments drove instructional practices in both Academic Intervention Services (AIS) and the Reading and Writing Workshop.  Students were placed in guiding reading groups through the Teacher’s College Reading & Writing Workshop Model to target specific skills that needed development based on the screener.

    In math, the same protocol applied.  The benchmark assessment, also administered three times a year, was the Star Math Renaissance Tool.  It is a computer adaptive assessment that gave specific data on specific skills that needed development.  Those students scoring in the area of needing improvement and below grade level were provided math AIS services throughout the year.

    The benchmarks or measures that our district uses (both summative and formative) to track the progress of ELLs are anecdotal records, pre and post-writing assessments in English Language Arts classes and content area classes, entrance and exit tickets in the math and other content area classrooms. In math and reading, ELLs are benchmarked three times a year as well, using the Fountas & Pinnell reading benchmark and the Star Math Renaissance program at the primary level and the Star Renaissance program for math and reading at the secondary level.  ELLs are progress-monitored every 1-2 weeks depending on their level of intervention. At the secondary level, we have a Scholastic Read 180 and Math 180 program in place as an intervention program for those ELLs in need of extra support in these two areas.

    The programs in the district for ELLs in 2015-2016 were: Elementary level: Co-teach and Stand Alone ENL programs during the school day and an ENL morning program including newcomer ELLs in the morning one hour before school.  Bilingual - English/English support for all newcomer students.

    Intermediate level: Co-teach model, Stand Alone ENL, Transitional Bilingual program for ELA and Math, Math and ELA Sheltered Instruction programs during the school day and an ENL morning program which included newcomer ELLs, ELLs with a Disability (with an IEP), SIFE, and Former ELLs in the morning one hour before school.

    Middle School level: Co-teach model, Stand Alone ENL, Transitional Bilingual program for Science and Social Studies and after school extra help sessions for homework and classwork, Lunch Bunch extra help.

    High School level: Co-teach model, Stand Alone ENL, Transitional Bilingual  taught classes for SIFE, ELA Sheltered Instruction, Ingenuity (computer based intervention tools for struggling ELLs), after school extra help sessions for homework and classwork.

    • Teacher’s College Reading Workshop
    • Teacher’s College Writing Workshop
    • Engage NY Math Program
    • Science 21
    • Kahoot
    • Nearpod
    • Reading A-Z
    • IXL math
    • Glenco Math Program
    • Leveled Literacy Intervention Reading Program
    • Fusion El Cuerpo Humano, Holt McDougal
    • Fusion The Human Body
    • The American Nation Guide to the Essentials English/Spanish
    • Fusion K-5
    • ESL Wonder Workbook All Around Me
    • ESL Wonder Workbook This is Me
    • Oxford Picture Dictionary English/Arabic
    • Oxford Picture Dictionary English/Spanish: Bilingual Dictionary for Spanish-speaking teenage and adult students of English
    • Webster’s English/Spanish Dictionary for Students
    • Oxford English-Urdu Dictionary
    • La ladrona de libros
    • Fahrenheit 451 (Spanish)
    • 1984 (Spanish)
    • To Kill a Mockingbird (Spanish)
    • Keys to Learning Workbook 2013
    • Keystone 2013 Workbook
    • Oxford Picture Dictionary Low Beginning Workbook
    • Oxford Picture Dictionary High Beginning Workbook
    • Long Walk to Water
    • Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems
    • LLI Grade K Booster Pack/Bundle
    • LLI Grade 1 Booster Pack/Bundle
    • Individualized iPads for each student at the Middle School
    • Raz-Kids Reading Program
    • DreamBox Math Program

    Curricular and extracurricular activities offered for students throughout the district are wide ranging, including, but not limited to intramurals, chorus, creative arts, newcomer groups, and accelerated reader programs at the elementary and intermediate levels.  At the secondary level, modified, JV and varsity sports, Connections club after school as well as student council, performing arts, newspaper, yearbook, honor societies, extra help, and an academy for students who need extra help academically, socially, and emotionally.  Transportation is provided for those students interested in staying after school to participate in these curricular and extracurricular activities. The participation in the above activities by ELLs depends on interest and logistics. In 2015-2016, ELLs participated in activities, including but not limited to chorus, intramurals, modified sports, clubs, and extra help.

    All English Language Learners in the BCSD are included in the identification process in order to provide support services for those students in need. Each English Language Learner is benchmarked three times a year in math and reading as well as daily in their classrooms.  In 2015-2016, the K-5 grade levels adopted the Fountas & Pinnell screener, a benchmark screening tool through Columbia University’s Teacher’s College (TC) Reading & Writing Workshop Model, to benchmark all students, including ELLs in reading comprehension. This screener was administered one on one with each student and assessed fluency and comprehension.  English Language Learners scoring below grade level were provided with reading services during the school day using the Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) Reading Program. The data gathered from the benchmark assessments drove instructional practices in both Academic Intervention Services (AIS) and Reading and Writing Workshops. Students were placed in guiding reading groups through the Teacher’s College Reading & Writing Workshop Model to target specific skills that needed development based on the screener. At the Middle School level, ELL students in need of intervention services have an Intervention period twice weekly with a certified TESOL teacher. At the High School level, ELL students in need of intervention have scheduled AIS classes in specific content areas. The Edgenuity program is also available to ELLs in need of academic intervention.

    In math, the same protocol applied.  The benchmark assessment, also administered three times a year, was the Star Math Renaissance Tool.  It is a computer adaptive assessment that gave specific data on specific skills that needed development.  Those students scoring in the area of needing improvement and below grade level were provided math AIS services throughout the year.

    The BCSD offers a morning program that includes newcomers of intensive literacy and language instruction 60-85 minutes a day, before school, 4-5 days at the elementary level (K-5). Newcomers are also pulled out in a Stand Alone ENL Model for 60 minutes per day, 5 days a week for explicit, targeted instruction. Newcomer ELLs at the Intermediate level (grades 3-5) work with a bilingual Social Worker in a Newcomer group to help them transition into their new school and culture.

    At the secondary level, Newcomer ELLs meet five times per week for 90 minutes each time learning English both through the content areas and in a stand alone ENL model.  Newcomer ELLs are supported by bilingual ENL Teachers and bilingual Teaching Assistant who use the Newcomer ELLs’ L1 to transition them as they learn English. These teachers and teaching assistants support ELLs both in the content-area classes as well as in Stand Alone ENL classes. At the middle school, specifically, an Integrated Co-Teaching/Early Exit Bilingual class is offered in Social Studies and Science.

    The focus of all instruction is to meet the expectations of the New York State Common Core Learning Standards and Bilingual Progressions. Student grouping decisions are based upon students’ English proficiency levels. A flexible approach, based upon student’s needs, is used by teachers so that they incorporate a variety of instructional approaches.

    In addition, BCSD offers preparation for the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) courses in Spanish during the school day. Students enrolled in these courses are encouraged to stay after their TASC courses and audit high school courses, penalty free, so that they increase their English language proficiency, learn more content, and integrate into the rest of the high school day.

    The BCSD also has partnered with Dutchess Community College (DCC) to provide a non-credit ENL course at the high school for SLIFE students. In collaboration with Dutchess Community College, we have aso created a program to teach English to older ELLs and families in the community offered by DCC.

    Support services and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for Developing ELLs are also designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our Developing ELLs, we have implemented two instructional programs, Intergrated-Co-Teach and Stand-Alone ENL.

    At the start of the 2015-2016 school year grades K-5 adopted the Teachers College Reading and Writing Workshop, the Fountas Pinnell benchmark assessment in Reading and the Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention for all readers in need of these services including ELLs.

    Additionally, the ENL program has taken measures to close the achievement gap by providing ENL services in Mathematics, an area where students have struggled and lagged behind their grade level peers. Content-specialized ENL teachers strive to support their students in an inclusive environment, by adapting and differentiating lessons, implementing SIOP strategies, and using best practices in TESOL.

    To help meet the demands of our SIFE, we have implemented three instructional programs, Integrated-Co-Teach, Stand-Alone ENL/Sheltered Instruction and Transitional Bilingual programs with an emphasis on building background knowledge and foundational skills needed to be successful in the content areas.

    Support services and Instructional practices in place specifically for Students with Interrupted/Inconsistent Formal Education (SIFE) in the Brewster Central School District are designed to build the foundational skills needed in the four core content areas: English, Math, Social studies, and Science.  

    At the elementary/intermediate levels, SIFE students are fully integrated in the general education classroom.  An ENL teacher supports SIFE students in both English Language Arts and Math during most, if not all, of these content area periods.  The instructional practices are designed to build a solid foundation in the content areas by building background knowledge, developing academic vocabulary, language, and content.

    At the secondary level, SIFE are placed on a foundations track upon arrival for at least one year depending on each student’s individual needs.  This foundations track provides classes that develop the foundational skills needed in English, Math, Science, and Social Studies.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for ELLs with a Disability (having an IEP) have focused on keeping our ELLs fully included in the mainstream classroom.  ENL teachers co-teach with classroom and Special Education teachers so that ELLs with a Disability (having an IEP) can remain in their classrooms in an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition while, at the same time, building their capacities in the content areas. There are other support services in place for ELLs with a Disability (with an IEP) based on their individual needs such as Speech and Language services, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy.

    Programs and instructional practices in place in the Brewster Central School District specifically for Long Term ELLs are designed to create  an inclusive, nurturing environment where all students feel safe to develop their English literacy and language acquisition.To help meet the demands of our Long Term ELLs, we have implemented two instructional programs, Integrated-Co-Teach and Stand-Alone ENL.

    Programs and Instructional practices in place specifically Long Term ELLs for Students in the Brewster Central School District are designed to build the foundational skills needed in the four core content areas: English, Math, Social Studies, and Science.  

    We have created a class for Long Term ELLs that specifically works on targeted skills needed in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This class is taught by a dually certified TESOL/Social Studies highly qualified teacher.   

    Our goal for our Long Term ELLs is to focus our efforts on specific and explicit targeted instruction in the four language modalities to continue to promote English Language Proficiency.

    On the K-5 level all Former ELLs are serviced for at least 150 minutes per week through a co-teach model. On the K- 2 level, services were provided by ENL teachers Gabriele Lappe and Christine Collesian.  On the intermediate level services were provided by Karen Dakin and Noelle Geniso. At the Middle and High School level former ELL students are monitored via a consultative method between the ENL teacher and their content teachers. Support services are added if needed. Services were provided by Yanire Wickers at the Middle School and Neisy Russo at the High School level.

    All English Language Learners in the BCSD are monitored, tracked, and supported in order to ensure academic and English language progress, including former ELLs.  All ELLs in K-5 were given the Fountas & Pinnell screener, a benchmark screening tool through Columbia University’s Teacher’s College (TC) Reading & Writing Workshop Model, three times in the 2015-2016 school year. This screener was administered one-on-one with each student which assessed fluency and comprehension.  English Language Learners scoring below grade level were provided with reading services during the school day using the Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) Reading Program. The data gathered from the benchmark assessments drove instructional practices in both Academic Intervention Services (AIS) and Reading and Writing Workshops.  Former ELLs were placed in guiding reading groups through the Teacher’s College Reading & Writing Workshop Model to target specific skills that needed development based on the screener. These skills were monitored, tracked, and supported during Reading and Writing Workshop.

    ELLs at the middle school are also monitored, tracked, and supported. All ELLs were given the Scholastic Math and Reading Inventory, a computer adapted benchmark, three times a year in 2015-2016 while,  ELLs at the high school were benchmarked with the Star Renaissance in reading administered in both English and Spanish and the results were used to monitor growth or lack thereof.

    In math, the same protocol applied.  The benchmark assessment, also administered three times a year, was the Star Math Renaissance Tool.  It is a computer adaptive assessment that gave specific data on specific skills that needed development.  Those students scoring in the area of needing improvement and below grade level were provided math AIS services throughout the year.

    The Brewster Central School District plan for professional learning is consistent with standards adopted by the the New York State Board of Regents, the State Education Department, the State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching and Learning Forward (formerly known as the National Staff Development Council) and the CR Part 154-2.3(k). These standards support the Commissioner’s Regulations.

    Indicators and Measures of Success

    • Throughout the year, a curriculum review team will meet to review the curriculum maps and units of study to monitor the alignment across the system of the CCLS.  
    • Throughout the year, central office and administrators will meet to review the progress of students who are challenged by the expectations of the learning standards and provide assistance and support for improved outcomes.
    • Surveys will be administered throughout the year to gather feedback from educators across the district about their needs.
    • Student performance data including writing samples will be reviewed by teachers and administrators.
    • Overtime, fewer students will require intensive RtI supports and services and more will exit these interventions.
    • Each year, we will see improved student performance on State assessments and Regents thus allowing more students/families to fill their schedules with choices that reflect their passions and aspirations as learners.

    Evaluation Plan

    Surveys will be administered throughout the year at the district and school level to assess the quality of the professional learning delivered internally and externally by inside and outside expertise. The district wide professional learning team will review these data and share it with schools so that we can develop ways to enhance and improve our experiences and outcomes.

    In addition, in 2015-2016, Dr. Marshall from Long Island University was contracted to present to the district faculty on Language Acquisition, ELL instructional practices. Including co-teaching and best practices. The District also partnered with LIU to provide extended certifications to teachers in TESOL and Bilingual Education as a form of Professional Development.  

    The district is also offering Spanish language classes to staff members across the district who are interested in learning Spanish to better support our English Language Learners and their families.

    Professional Development for ELLs:

    • Supportive Language ELLs, PNW BOCES
    • MakerSpace, PNW BOCES
    • Supportive Language & Literacy Instruction For SIFE ELLS, PNW BOCES
    • WMHLI-What All Admins Need to Know ELL, PNW BOCES
    • 7th Annual Summer Leadership Institute, Syracuse University
    • Beginner Spanish I, Lorraine Way
    • Beginner Spanish II, Lorraine Way
    • English Learners in Your Classroom, Dr. Helene Marshall
    • Rosetta Stone Licenses
    • Fountas & Pinnell Intervention Workshop, Karen Alevy
    • Teachers College Reading & Writing, Karen Alevy
    • K-2 Teacher, Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment, Karen Alevy
    • 3-5 Teacher, Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment, Karen Alevy
    • Fountas &Pinnell Assessment, Karen Alevy
    • K-2 Fountas & Pinnell Assessment, Karen Alevy
    • Fountas & Pinnell Retraining, Karen Alevy
    • Wrote RtI goals for 2015-2016, Lois Baldwin
    • Review RtI process and wrote goals for 2015-2016, Lois Baldwin
    • Reviewed goals and purpose of RtI for 2014-15 & goals for 2015-16, Lois Baldwin
    • Data Team review & RtI goals, RtI/CSE pre-referral guide, Lois Baldwin
    • Reviewed F&P , process to establish Tier 2 & 3, writing SMART goals, Lois Baldwin
    • Reviewed F&P & math data to establish Tier 2 * 3 groups, Lois Baldwin
    • Reviewed data & developed Tier 2 groups; reviewed RtI w/DO, Lois Baldwin
    • JFK-reviewed data; WMS developed RtI ppt for SCD, Lois Baldwin
    • RtI presentation to staff, Lois Baldwin
    • Tier 2 & 3 reading & math interventions to evaluate data, groups, SMART goals, Lois Baldwin
    • Reviewed Qtr. 1 data, student progress, SMART goals, Lois Baldwin
    • Fountas & Pinnell Reading Intervention Training, Laurie Baker
    • Fountas & Pinnell Reading Intervention Training, Jody Hoffman
    • Fountas & Pinnell Reading Intervention Training, Diane Stuart
    • Data Driven Inquiry, Kathleen Tuttle
    • Reading & Writing Project Network K-2, Katie Lindner & LaKisha Howell
    • Reading & Writing Project Network 3-5, Hareem Atif Khan
    • Reading & Writing Project Network 6-8, Audra Robb